Princess Juliana International Airport, St. Maarten

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Opened in October 2006, the modern terminal of the Princess Juliana International Airport (IATA Code: SXM) still looks new.

 

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Princess Juliana International Airport, also known as St. Maarten International Airport in Simpson Bay, St. Maarten

Princess Juliana International Airport (IATA: SXM, ICAO: TNCM), also known as St. Maarten International Airport, is one of two airports serving the island of Saint Martin. The southern part of the island is occupied by St. Maarten , a constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, with its capital Philipsburg. The northern half, is the French overseas territory of Saint-Martin.

SXM is Amsterdam’s gateway to the Caribbean. It is named after Juliana of the Netherlands, who as crown princess landed here in 1944, the year after the airport opened. SMX is considered to be one of the extreme airports in the world, with dangerous, albeit spectacular, landings and take offs.

Out of St. Maarten

Simpson Bay, St. Maarten, as seen from my airplane window. Isle del Sol Marina on Snoopy Is. is seen on the foregorund.

Simpson Bay, St. Maarten, as seen from my airplane window. Isle del Sol Marina on Snoopy Is. is seen on the foregorund.

St. Maarten, with its capital Philipsburg, is a constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. It occupies the southern half of the Caribbean island of Saint Martin, while the northern half of the island is the French overseas territory, Saint-Martin.

The island is Amsterdam’s gateway to the Caribbean.

Ancient Theatre, Sabratha

The remnants of the theatre at the ancient Roman city of Sabratha in present-day Libya.

The remnants of the theatre at the ancient Roman city of Sabratha in present-day Libya.

The remnants of the facade of the theatre at the ancient Roman city of Sabratha in present-day Libya.

The remnants of the facade of the theatre at the ancient Roman city of Sabratha in present-day Libya.

Sabratha, was another prominent city of the ancient Roman Empire. Located in the northwestern part of present-day Libya, along the Mediterranean Sea coast, it is a short 66-km drive west from the Libyan capital, Tripoli. It is an archaeological site and was declared as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1982.

Was here winter of 2010, two months before Libya got affected by the Arab Spring of 2011.

Arch of Septimus Severus, Leptis Magna

The Arch of Septimus Severus is the most dominant structure in the ancient city of Leptis Magna in present day Libya.

The Arch of Septimus Severus is the most dominant structure in Leptis Magna, one of the most prominent cities of the ancient Roman Empire in northern Africa (present day Libya).

The remains of the Arch of Septimus Severus stands proud along the main avenue of Leptis Magna, one of the most prominent cities of the ancient Roman Empire in northern Africa .

The remains of the Arch of Septimus Severus stands proud along the main avenue of Leptis Magna, one of the most prominent cities of the ancient Roman Empire in northern Africa .

Leptis Magna or Lebda to modern-day residents of  Libya, was a prominent city of the ancient Roman Empire. Its ruins are located in Khoms, Libya, 130 km east of the capital Tripoli. The site is one of the most spectacular and unspoiled Roman ruins in the Mediterranean.

Was here autumn of 2010, three months before Libya got affected by the Arab Spring of 2011.

Miag-ao Fortress Church

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The Miag-ao Church, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, sits on the top of a hill, right on the center of the town of Miag-ao, Iloilo.

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Miag-ao Church’s right belfry cuts an imposing figure under the midday sun.

The most notable of Iloilo’s churches, the European baroque church of Santo Tomas de Villanueva popularly known as the Miag-ao Church, sits on the top of a hill overlooking the Panay Gulf, right on the center of the town of Miag-ao, about 40 kilometers west of the city.

As a UNESCO World Heritage Site, Miag-ao Church is probably the best-known symbol of Iloilo to the world.

Jaro Cathedral Belfry

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The belfry of the Jaro Metropolitan Cathedral in Iloilo City, stands alone at the Graciano Lopez-Jaena Park.

The Jaro Metropolitan Cathedral belfry is one of just a few free-standing bell towers in the country. Standing about a few hundred steps across the street from the cathedral, it dominates the landscape around the district plaza (formally known as the Graciano Lopez-Jaena Park) of Jaro, Iloilo City.

Today, February 2, is the feast of Our Lady of the Candles, the patron saint of Jaro, and of the entire archdiocese.